Archivo de la etiqueta: metafísica

Todo y nada

I once attended a spiritual self-help kind of course. Toward the end of the course, there was this exercise where the teacher would ask the question, “What are you?” Whatever answer the participant came up with, the teacher would tear it apart. Por ejemplo, if I said, “I work for a bank as a quantitative finance professional,” she would say, “Sí, that’s what you do, but what are you?” If I said, “I am Manoj,” she would say, “Sí, that’s only your name, what are you?” You get the idea. To the extent that it is a hard question to answer, the teacher always gets the upper hand.

Not in my case though. Luckily for me, I was the last one to answer the question, and I had the benefit of seeing how this exercise evolved. Since I had time, I decided to cook up something substantial. So when my turn came, here was my response that pretty much floored the teacher. I said, “I am a little droplet of consciousness so tiny that I’m nothing, yet part of something so big that I’m everything.” As I surmised, she couldn’t very well say, “Sí, seguro, but what are you?” De hecho, she could’ve said, “That’s just some serious bullshit, hombre, what the heck are you?” which is probably what I would’ve done. But my teacher, being the kind and gentle soul she is, decided to thank me gravely and move on.

Now I want to pick up on that theme and point out that there is more to that response than something impressive that I made up that day to sound really cool in front of a bunch of spiritualites. The tininess part is easy. Our station in this universe is so mindbogglingly tiny that a sense of proportion is the one thing we cannot afford to have, if we are to keep our sanity — as Douglas Adams puts it in one of his books. What goes for the physical near-nothingness of our existence in terms of space also applies to the temporal dimension. We exist for a mere fleeing instant when put in the context of any geological or cosmological timescale. So when I called myself a “little” droplet, I was being kind, if anything.

But being part of something so vast — de, that is the interesting bit. Físicamente, there is not an atom in my body that wasn’t part of a star somewhere sometime ago. We are all made up of stardust, from the ashes of dead stars. (Interesting they say from dust to dust and from ashes to ashes, isn’t it?) Así, those sappy scenes in sentimental flicks, where the dad points to the star and says, “Your mother is up there sweetheart, watching over you,” have a bit of scientific truth to them. All the particles in my body will end up in a star (a red giant, in our case); the only stretch is that it will take another four and half billion years. But it does mean that the dust will live forever and end up practically everywhere through some supernova explosion, if our current understanding of how it all works is correct (which it is not, En mi opinión, but that is another story). This eternal existence of a the purely physical kind is what Schopenhauer tried to draw consolation from, Yo creo, but it really is no consolation, if you ask me. No obstante, we are all part of something much bigger, spatially and temporally – in a purely physical sense.

At a deeper level, my being part of everything comes from the fact that we are both the inside and the outside of things. I know it sounds like I smoked something I wouldn’t like my children to smoke. Me explico; this will take a few words. Lo ves, when we look at a star, we of course see a star. But what we mean by “see a star” is just that there are some neurons in our brain firing in a particular pattern. We assume that there is a star out there causing some photons to fall on our retina and create neuronal firing, which results in a cognitive model of what we call night sky and stars. We further assume that what we see (night sky and star) is a faithful representation of what is out there. But why should it be? Think of how we hear stuff. When we listen to music, we hear tonality, loudness etc, but these are only cognitive models for the frequency and amplitude of the pressure waves in the air, as we understand sound right now. Frequency and amplitude are very different beasts compared to tonality and loudness — the former are physical causes, the latter are perceptual experiences. Take away the brain, there is no experience, ergo there is no sound — which is the gist of the overused cocktail conundrum of the falling tree in a deserted forest. If you force yourself to think along these lines for a while, you will have to admit that whatever is “por ahí” as you perceive it is only in your brain as cognitive constructs. Hence my hazy statement about we are both the inside and the outside of things. Así, from the perspective of cognitive neuroscience, we can argue that we are everything — the whole universe and our knowledge of it is all are patterns in our brain. No hay nada más.

Want to go even deeper? Bueno, the brain itself is part of the reality (which is a cognitive construct) created by the brain. So are the air pressure waves, photons, retina, la neurociencia cognitiva, etc. All convenient models in our brains. Eso, por supuesto, is an infinite regression, from which there is no escape. It is a logical abyss where we can find no rational foothold to anchor our thoughts and crawl out, which naturally leads to what we call the infinite, the unknowable, la absoluta, the eternal — Brahman.

I was, por supuesto, thinking of Brahman ( and the notion that we are all part of that major oneness) when I cooked up that everything-and-nothing response. But it is all the same, isn’t it, whichever way you look at it? Bueno, may be not; may be it is just that I see it that way. If the only tool you have is a hammer, all the problems in the world look like nails to you. May be I’m just hammering in the metaphysical nails whenever and wherever I get a chance. A mí, all schools of thought seem to converge to similar notions. Reminds of that French girl I was trying impress long time ago. I said to her, rather optimistically, “Ya sabes, you and I think alike, that’s what I like about you.” She replied, “Bueno, there is only one way to think, if you think at all. So no big deal!” Needless to say I didn’t get anywhere with her.

Dualism

After being called one of the superior 50 philosophy bloggers, I feel almost obliged to write another post on philosophy. This might vex Jat who, while appreciating the post on my first car, was somewhat less than enthusiastic about my deeper thoughts. Also looking askance at my philosophical endeavors would be a badminton buddy of mine who complained that my posts on death scared the bejesus out of him. Pero, ¿qué puedo decir, I have been listening to a lot of philosophy. I listened to the lectures by Shelly Kagan on just that dreaded topic of death, and by John Searle (otra vez) on the philosophy of mind.

Listening to these lectures filled me with another kind of dread. I realized once again how ignorant I am, and how much there is to know, think and figure out, and how little time is left to do all that. Perhaps this recognition of my ignorance is a sign of growing wisdom, if we can believe Socrates. At least I hope it is.

One thing I had some misconceptions about (or an incomplete understanding of) was this concept of dualism. Growing up in India, I heard a lot about our monistic philosophy called Advaita. The word means not-two, and I understood it as the rejection of the Brahman and Maya distinction. Para ilustrar con un ejemplo, say you sense something — like you see these words in front of you on your computer screen. Are these words and the computer screen out there really? If I were to somehow generate the neuronal firing patterns that create this sensation in you, you would see these words even if they were not there. This is easy to understand; después de todo, this is the main thesis of the movie Matrix. So what you see is merely a construct in your brain; it is Maya or part of the Matrix. What is causing the sensory inputs is presumably Brahman. Así, to me, Advaita meant trusting only the realness of Brahman while rejecting Maya. Ahora, after reading a bit more, I’m not sure that was an accurate description at all. Perhaps that is why Ranga criticized me long time ago.

In Western philosophy, there is a different and more obvious kind of dualism. It is the age-old mind-matter distinction. What is mind made of? Most of us think of mind (those who think of it, es decir) as a computer program running on our brain. En otras palabras, mind is software, brain is hardware. They are two different kinds of things. Después de todo, we pay separately for hardware (Dell) and software (Microsoft). Since we think of them as two, ours is an inherently dualistic view. Before the time of computers, Descartes thought of this problem and said there was a mental substance and a physical substance. So this view is called Cartesian Dualism. (A propósito, Cartesian coordinates in analytic geometry came from Descartes as well — a fact that might enhance our respect for him.) It is a view that has vast ramifications in all branches of philosophy, from metaphysics to theology. It leads to the concepts of spirit and souls, Dios, afterlife, reincarnation etc., with their inescapable implications on morality.

There are philosophers who reject this notion of Cartesian dualism. John Searle is one of them. They embrace a view that mind is an emergent property of the brain. An emergent property (more fancily called an epiphenomenon) is something that happens incidentally along with the main phenomenon, but is neither the cause nor the effect of it. An emergent property in physics that we are familiar with is temperature, which is a measure of the average velocity of a bunch of molecules. You cannot define temperature unless you have a statistically significant collection of molecules. Searle uses the wetness of water as his example to illustrate emergence of properties. You cannot have a wet water molecule or a dry one, but when you put a lot of water molecules together you get wetness. Del mismo modo, mind emerges from the physical substance of the brain through physical processes. So all the properties that we ascribe to mind are to be explained away as physical interactions. There is only one kind of substance, which is physical. So this monistic philosophy is called physicalism. Physicalism is part of materialism (not to be confused with its current meaning — what we mean by a material girl, por ejemplo).

Ya sabes, la trouble with philosophy is that there are so many isms that you lose track of what is going on in this wild jungle of jargonism. If I coined the word unrealism to go with my blog and promoted it as a branch of philosophy, or better yet, a Singaporean school of thought, I’m sure I can make it stick. Or perhaps it is already an accepted domain?

All kidding aside, the view that everything on the mental side of life, such as consciousness, thoughts, ideals etc., is a manifestation of physical interactions (I’m restating the definition of physicalism here, as you can see) enjoys certain currency among contemporary philosophers. Both Kagan and Searle readily accept this view, por ejemplo. But this view is in conflict with what the ancient Greek philosophers like Socrates, Plato and Aristotle thought. They all believed in some form of continued existence of a mental substance, be it the soul, spirit or whatever. All major religions have some variant of this dualism embedded in their beliefs. (I think Plato’s dualism is of a different kind — a real, imperfect world where we live on the one hand, and an ideal perfect world of forms on the other where the souls and Gods live. More on that later.) Después de todo, God has to be made up of a spiritual “substance” other than a pure physical substance. Or how could he not be subject to the physical laws that we, mere mortals, can comprehend?

Nothing in philosophy is totally disconnected from one another. A fundamental stance such as dualism or monism that you take in dealing with the questions on consciousness, cognition and mind has ramifications in what kind of life you lead (Ethics), cómo you define reality (Metaphysics), y cómo you know these things (Epistemology). Through its influence on religions, it may even impact our political power struggles of our troubled times. If you think about it long enough, you can connect the dualist/monist distinction even to aesthetics. Después de todo, Richard Pirsig did just that in his Zen y el arte del mantenimiento de la motocicleta.

As they say, if the only tool you have is a hammer, all problems begin to look like nails. My tool right now is philosophy, so I see little philosophical nails everywhere.

El universo Unreal

Sabemos que nuestro universo es un poco irreal. Las estrellas que vemos en el cielo nocturno, por ejemplo, no están realmente allí. Ellos pueden haberse movido o incluso muerto en el momento en que llegamos a verlos. Se necesita tiempo para viajar la luz de las estrellas y galaxias distantes para llegar a nosotros. Sabemos de este retraso. El sol que vemos ahora ya es de ocho minutos de edad para el momento en que lo vemos, que no es un gran problema. Si queremos saber lo que está pasando en el sol en este momento, todo lo que tenemos que hacer es esperar durante ocho minutos. No obstante, tenemos que “correcta” por el retraso en la percepción debido a la velocidad finita de la luz antes de que podamos confiar en lo que vemos.

Ahora, este efecto plantea una pregunta interesante — lo que es lo “reales” Lo que vemos? Si ver es creer, las cosas que vemos debe ser la cosa real. Entonces de nuevo, sabemos del efecto tiempo de viaje luz. Así que debemos corregir lo que vemos antes de creer que. Entonces, ¿qué hace “ver” significará? Cuando decimos que vemos algo, ¿qué es lo que realmente queremos decir?

Seeing implica luz, obviamente. Es lo finito (aunque muy alto) velocidad de la luz influye y distorsiona la forma de ver las cosas, al igual que la demora en ver objetos como estrellas. Lo que es sorprendente (y rara vez resaltado) es que cuando se trata de ver objetos en movimiento, no podemos respaldar a calcular de la misma manera sacamos la demora en ver el sol. Si vemos un cuerpo celeste que se mueve a una improbablemente alta velocidad, no podemos averiguar qué velocidad y en qué dirección es “realmente” moviéndose sin hacer supuestos adicionales. Una forma de manejar esta dificultad es atribuir las distorsiones en la percepción de las propiedades fundamentales de la arena de la física — espacio y el tiempo. Otra línea de acción es la de aceptar la desconexión entre nuestra percepción y la subyacente “realidad” y tratar con él de alguna manera.

Esta desconexión entre lo que vemos y lo que hay no es desconocido para muchas escuelas filosóficas del pensamiento. Fenomenalismo, por ejemplo, sostiene la opinión de que el espacio y el tiempo no son realidades objetivas. Ellos no son más que el medio de nuestra percepción. Todos los fenómenos que ocurren en el espacio y el tiempo no son más que haces de nuestra percepción. En otras palabras, espacio y el tiempo son construcciones cognitivas surgen de la percepción. Así, todas las propiedades físicas que atribuimos al espacio y el tiempo sólo se pueden aplicar a la realidad fenoménica (la realidad tal como la percibimos). La realidad noumenal (que mantiene las causas físicas de nuestra percepción), por el contrario, queda fuera de nuestro alcance cognitivo.

Uno, casi accidental, dificultad en la redefinición de los efectos de la velocidad finita de la luz, como las propiedades del espacio y el tiempo es que cualquier efecto que nosotros entendemos consigue al instante relegado al reino de las ilusiones ópticas. Por ejemplo, el retraso de ocho minutos en ver el sol, porque podemos entender fácilmente y desvincularla de nuestra percepción usando aritmética simple, se considera una mera ilusión óptica. Sin embargo, las distorsiones en la percepción de objetos en movimiento rápido, aunque originario de la misma fuente se considera una propiedad del espacio y el tiempo, ya que son más complejos. En algún punto, tenemos que llegar a un acuerdo con el hecho de que cuando se trata de ver el universo, no hay tal cosa como una ilusión óptica, que es probablemente lo que Goethe señaló cuando dijo, “Ilusión óptica es verdad óptica.”

More about The Unreal UniverseLa distinción (o falta de ella) entre la ilusión óptica y la verdad es uno de los debates más antiguos de la filosofía. Después de todo, se trata de la distinción entre el conocimiento y la realidad. El conocimiento es considerado nuestro punto de vista sobre algo que, en la realidad, es “realmente el caso.” En otras palabras, el conocimiento es un reflejo, o una imagen mental de algo externo. En esta foto, la realidad externa pasa por un proceso de convertirse en nuestro conocimiento, que incluye la percepción, actividades cognitivas, y el ejercicio de la razón pura. Esta es la imagen que la física ha llegado a aceptar. Si bien reconoce que nuestra percepción puede ser imperfecta, la física supone que podemos conseguir más y más a la realidad externa a través de la experimentación cada vez más fino, y, más importante, mediante una mejor teorización. Las teorías especial y general de la relatividad son ejemplos de brillantes aplicaciones de esta visión de la realidad donde los principios físicos simples son implacablemente perseguidos utilizar la máquina formidable de la razón pura a sus conclusiones lógicamente inevitables.

Pero hay otra, vista competir de conocimiento y la realidad que ha existido durante mucho tiempo. Esta es la opinión de que se refiere a la realidad percibida como una representación cognitiva interna de nuestras entradas sensoriales. En este punto de vista, conocimiento y la realidad percibida son dos constructos cognitivos internos, aunque hemos llegado a pensar en ellos como algo separado. Lo que es externo no es la realidad tal como la percibimos, sino una entidad incognoscible dando origen a las causas físicas detrás de los estímulos sensoriales. En esta escuela de pensamiento, construimos nuestra realidad en dos, a menudo se superponen, pasos. La primera etapa consiste en el proceso de detección, y la segunda es la de razonamiento cognitivo y lógico. Podemos aplicar esta visión de la realidad y el conocimiento de la ciencia, pero para hacerlo, tenemos que adivinar la naturaleza de la realidad absoluta, incognoscible, ya que es.

Las ramificaciones de estas dos posturas filosóficas diferentes descritos anteriormente son enormes. Desde la física moderna ha abrazado una visión no phenomenalistic de espacio y tiempo, que se encuentra en desacuerdo con esa rama de la filosofía. Este abismo entre la filosofía y la física ha crecido a tal grado que el premio Nobel físico ganador, Steven Weinberg, preguntado (en su libro “Sueños de una Teoría Final de”) ¿por qué la contribución de la filosofía a la física han sido tan sorprendentemente pequeño. También pide a los filósofos a hacer declaraciones como, “La realidad noumenal Ya sea 'provoca la realidad fenoménica’ o si la "realidad noumenal es independiente de nuestra sintiéndola’ o si "percibimos la realidad noumenal,’ el problema es que el concepto de la realidad noumenal es un concepto totalmente redundante para el análisis de la ciencia.”

Desde la perspectiva de la neurociencia cognitiva, todo lo que vemos, sentido, sentir y pensar es el resultado de las interconexiones neuronales en nuestro cerebro y las pequeñas señales eléctricas en ellos. Esta visión debe ser correcto. ¿Qué más hay? Todos nuestros pensamientos y preocupaciones, conocimientos y creencias, ego y la realidad, vida y la muerte — todo está despidos meramente neuronales en el medio y kilogramos de empalagoso, materia gris, que es nuestro cerebro. No hay nada más. Nada!

De hecho, esta visión de la realidad en la neurociencia es un eco exacto de fenomenalismo, que considera todo un haz de percepción o mentales construcciones. El espacio y el tiempo también son construcciones cognitivas en el cerebro, como todo lo demás. Son imágenes mentales que nuestros cerebros se inventan de los estímulos sensoriales que nuestros sentidos reciben. Generado a partir de nuestra percepción sensorial y fabricado por nuestro proceso cognitivo, el continuo espacio-tiempo es el ámbito de la física. De todos nuestros sentidos, la vista es, con mucho, el dominante. La información sensorial a la vista es la luz. En un espacio creado por el cerebro de la luz que cae sobre nuestras retinas (o en los fotosensores del telescopio Hubble), ¿es una sorpresa que nada puede viajar más rápido que la luz?

Esta postura filosófica es la base de mi libro, El universo Unreal, que explora los elementos comunes de la física y la filosofía de unión. Tales reflexiones filosóficas generalmente tienen una mala reputación desde nosotros los físicos. Para los físicos, la filosofía es un campo totalmente diferente, otro silo de conocimientos, que sostiene ninguna relevancia para sus esfuerzos. Tenemos que cambiar esta creencia y apreciamos el solapamiento entre los diferentes silos de conocimiento. Es en esta superposición que podemos esperar encontrar grandes avances en el pensamiento humano.

El giro a esta historia de la luz y la realidad es que parece que hemos sabido todo esto por un largo tiempo. Escuelas filosóficas clásicas parecen haber pensado de forma muy similar a los razonamientos de Einstein. El papel de la luz en la creación de nuestra realidad o universo está en el centro del pensamiento religioso occidental. Un universo desprovisto de luz no es simplemente un mundo donde usted ha apagado las luces. De hecho, es un universo carente de sí mismo, un universo que no existe. Es en este contexto que tenemos que entender la sabiduría detrás de la afirmación de que “la tierra estaba desordenada, y sin efecto” hasta que Dios hizo la luz para ser, diciendo “Hágase la luz.”

El Corán también dice, “Allah es la luz de los cielos y la tierra,” que se refleja en una de las antiguas escrituras hindúes: “Llévame de la oscuridad a la luz, me llevan de lo irreal a lo real.” El papel de la luz en la que nos lleva desde el vacío irreal (la nada) a una realidad de hecho se entiende por un largo, mucho tiempo. ¿Es posible que los antiguos santos y profetas sabían cosas que sólo ahora estamos empezando a descubrir con todos nuestros supuestos avances en el conocimiento?

Sé que puedo pensaré en donde los ángeles temen pisar, para reinterpretar las Escrituras es un juego peligroso. Tales interpretaciones extrañas rara vez son aceptados en los círculos teológicos. Pero me refugio en el hecho de que estoy en busca de concurrencia en los puntos de vista metafísicos de las filosofías espirituales, sin disminuir su valor místico y teológico.

Los paralelos entre la distinción-nouménico fenomenal en el fenomenalismo y el Brahman-Maya distinción en Advaita son difíciles de ignorar. Esta sabiduría probada por el tiempo de la naturaleza de la realidad desde el repertorio de la espiritualidad está siendo reinventado en la neurociencia moderna, que trata la realidad como una representación cognitiva creada por el cerebro. El cerebro utiliza los estímulos sensoriales, memoria, conciencia, e incluso el lenguaje como ingredientes en inventar nuestro sentido de la realidad. Esta visión de la realidad, sin embargo, es algo que la física está aún por llegar a un acuerdo con. Pero en la medida en que su ámbito (espacio y el tiempo) es una parte de la realidad, la física no es inmune a la filosofía.

A medida que empujamos los límites de nuestro conocimiento cada vez más, estamos empezando a descubrir las interconexiones insospechadas ya menudo sorprendentes entre las diferentes ramas de los esfuerzos humanos. En el análisis final, ¿cómo pueden los diversos ámbitos de nuestro conocimiento ser independientes entre sí cuando todo nuestro conocimiento reside en nuestro cerebro? El conocimiento es una representación cognitiva de nuestras experiencias. Pero a continuación,, así es la realidad; es una representación cognitiva de nuestras entradas sensoriales. Es una falacia pensar que el conocimiento es la representación interna de una realidad externa, y por lo tanto distinta de ella. El conocimiento y la realidad son dos constructos cognitivos internos, aunque hemos llegado a pensar en ellos como algo separado.

Reconociendo y haciendo uso de las interconexiones entre los diferentes dominios de la actividad humana puede ser el catalizador para el próximo gran avance en nuestra sabiduría colectiva que hemos estado esperando.

El legado de Humboldt por Saul Bellow

I first found this modern-day classic in my father’s collection some thirty years ago, which meant that he bought it right around the time it was published. Mirando hacia atrás ahora, and after having read the book, as usual, many times over, I am surprised that he had actually read it. May be I am underestimating him in my colossal and unwarranted arrogance, but I just cannot see how he could have followed the book. Even after having lived in the USA for half a dozen years, and read more philosophy than is good for me, I cannot keep up with the cultural references and the pace of Charlie Citrine’s mind through its intellectual twists and turns. Did my father actually read it? I wish I could ask him.

Perhaps that is the point of this book, as it is with most classics — the irreversibility and finality of death. Or may be it is my jaundiced vision painting everything yellow. But Bellow does rage against this finality of death (just like most religions do); he comically postulates that it is our metaphysical denial that hides the immortal souls watching over us. Perhaps he is right; it certainly is comforting to believe it.

There is always an element of parternality in every mentor-protégé relationship. (Forgive me, I know it is a sexist view — why not maternality?) But I probably started this post with the memories of my father because of this perceived element in the Von Humboldt Fleischer – Charlie Citrine relationship, complete with the associated feelings of guilt and remorse on the choices that had to be made.

As a book, Humboldt’s Gift is a veritable tour de force. It is a blinding blitz of erudition and wisdom, coming at you at a pace and intensity that is hard to stand up to. It talks about the painted veil, Maya, the many colored glasses staining the white radiance of eternity, and Hegel’s phenomenology as though they are like coffee and cheerios. A mí, this dazzling display of intellectual fireworks is unsettling. I get a glimpse of the enormity of what is left to know, and the paucity of time left to learn it, and I worry. It is the ultimate Catch-22 — by the time you figure it all out, it is time to go, and the knowledge is useless. Perhaps knowledge has always been useless in that sense, but it is still a lot of fun to figure things out.

The book is a commentary on American materialism and the futility of idealism in our modern times. It is also about the small things where a heart finds fulfillment. Here is the setting of the story in a nutshell. Charlie Citrine, a protégé to Von Humboldt Fleischer, makes it big in his literary career. Fleischer himself, full of grandiose schemes for a cultural renaissance in America, dies a failure. Charlie’s success comes at its usual price. In an ugly divorce, his vulturous ex-wife, Denise, tries to milk him for every penny he’s worth. His mercenary mistress and a woman-and-a-half, Renata, targets his riches from other angles. Then there is the boisterous Cantabile who is ultimately harmless, and the affable and classy Thaxter who is much more damaging. The rest of the story follows some predictable, and some surprising twists. Storylines are something I stay away from in my reviews, for I don’t want to be posting spoilers.

I am sure there is a name for this style of narration that jumps back and forth in time with no regard to chronology. I first noticed it in Catch-22 and recently in Arundhati Roy’s God of Small Things. It always fills me with a kind of awe because the writer has the whole story in mind, and is revealing aspects of it at will. It is like showing different projections of a complex object. This style is particularly suited for Humboldt’s Gift, because it is a complex object like a huge diamond, and the different projections show brilliant flashes of insights. Staining the white radiance of eternity, por supuesto.

To say that Humboldt’s Gift is a masterpiece is like saying that sugar is sweet. It goes without saying. I will read this book many more times in the future because of its educational values (and because I love the reader in my audiobook edition). I would not necessarily recommend the book to others though. I think it takes a peculiar mind, one that finds sanity only in insane gibberish, and sees unreality in all the painted veils of reality, to appreciate this book.

En breve, you have to be a bit cuckoo to like it. Pero, by the same convoluted logic, this negative recommendation is perhaps the strongest endorsement of all. So here goes… Don’t read it. I forbid it!

El universo Unreal – Reviewed

The Straits Times

pback-cover (17K)El periódico nacional de Singapur, los tiempos de los estrechos, alaba el estilo de lectura y conversación utilizado en El universo Unreal y recomienda a cualquiera que quiera aprender sobre la vida, el universo y todo.

Wendy Lochner

Llamando El universo Unreal una buena lectura, Wendy dice, “Está bien escrito, muy claro a seguir para el no especialista.”

Bobbie Navidad

Describiendo El universo Unreal como “un libro tan perspicaz e inteligente,” Bobbie dice, “Un libro para pensar laicos, esta lectura, invita a la reflexión trabajo ofrece una nueva perspectiva sobre nuestra definición de la realidad.”

M. S. Chandramouli,,te,Chandramouli se graduó del Instituto Indio de Tecnología,,en,Madras en,,en,y posteriormente realizó su MBA del Indian Institute of Management,,en,Ahmedabad,,en,Después de una carrera ejecutiva en India y Europa cubriendo algunos,,en,años fundó Surya International en Bélgica a través de la cual ahora ofrece servicios de desarrollo empresarial y marketing industrial.,,en,Esto es lo que dice sobre,,en,El libro tiene un diseño muy agradable.,,en,con el tamaño correcto de fuente y espacio entre líneas y densidad de contenido correcta,,en,Gran esfuerzo por un libro autoeditado,,en,El impacto del libro es caleidoscópico.,,en,Los patrones en la mente de un lector,,en,se movió y se reorganizó con un susurro,,en,mas de una vez.,,en

M. S. Chandramouli graduated from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras in 1966 and subsequently did his MBA from the Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad. After an executive career in India and Europe covering some 28 years he founded Surya International in Belgium through which he now offers business development and industrial marketing services.

Here is what he says about El universo Unreal:

“The book has a very pleasing layout, with the right size of font and line spacing and correct content density. Great effort for a self-published book!”

“The impact of the book is kaleidoscopic. The patterns in one reader’s mind (mina, es decir) shifted and re-arranged themselves with a ‘rustling noise’ more than once.””El estilo de escritura del autor es notablemente equidistante de la prosa turbia de los indios que escriben sobre filosofía o religión y el estilo de los autores occidentales que conocemos todo sobre la filosofía de la ciencia.,,en,Hay una especie de cosmos,,en,fondo ‘Eureka,,en,eso parece empapar todo el libro,,en,Su tesis central sobre la diferencia entre la realidad percibida y la realidad absoluta es una idea que espera florecer en un millón de mentes.,,en,La prueba sobre la ‘Emocionalidad de la fe,,en,fue notablemente profético,,en,funciono para mi,,en,No estoy seguro de que la primera parte,,en,que es esencialmente descriptivo y filosófico,,en,se sienta cómodamente con la segunda parte con su física bien argumentada,,en,si y cuando el autor está en camino de ganar el argumento,,en,puede querer ver tres categorías diferentes de lectores,,en”

“There is a sort of cosmic, background ‘Eureka!’ that seems to suffuse the entire book. Its central thesis about the difference between perceived reality and absolute reality is an idea waiting to bloom in a million minds.”

“The test on the ‘Emotionality of Faith,’ Página 171, was remarkably prescient; it worked for me!”

“I am not sure that the first part, which is essentially descriptive and philosophical, sits comfortably with the second part with its tightly-argued physics; if and when the author is on his way to winning the argument, he may want to look at three different categories of readers – los laicos pero inteligentes que necesitan un grado de traducción ‘,,en,el especialista no físico,,en,y los filósofos físicos,,en,La segmentación del mercado es la clave del éxito.,,en,Creo que este libro necesita ser leído ampliamente,,en,Estoy haciendo un pequeño intento de enchufarlo copiando esto a mis amigos cercanos.,,en,Steven Bryant,,en,Steven es vicepresidente de servicios de consultoría para,,en,Lógica primitiva,,en,un primer integrador regional de sistemas ubicado en San Francisco,,en,Es el autor de,,en,El desafío de la relatividad,,en,Manoj ve la ciencia como solo un elemento en la imagen de la vida,,en,La ciencia no define la vida.,,en,Pero la vida colorea cómo entendemos la ciencia,,en,Desafía a todos los lectores a repensar sus sistemas de creencias.,,en,para cuestionar lo que pensaban que era real,,en,preguntar,,en,por qué,,en,Él nos pide que nos quitemos nuestro,,en,gafas de color rosa,,en,’ the non-physicist specialist, and the physicist philosophers. Market segmentation is the key to success.”

“I think this book needs to be read widely. I am making a small attempt at plugging it by copying this to my close friends.”

Steven Bryant

Steven is a Vice President of Consulting Services for Primitive Logic, a premier Regional Systems Integrator located in San Francisco, California. He is the author of The Relativity Challenge.

“Manoj views science as just one element in the picture of life. Science does not define life. But life colors how we understand science. He challenges all readers to rethink their believe systems, to question what they thought was real, to ask “why”? He asks us to take off our “rose colored glasses” y desbloquea nuevas formas de experimentar y comprender la vida,,en,Este trabajo que invita a la reflexión debería requerir leer a cualquiera que se embarque en un nuevo viaje científico.,,en,El tratamiento del tiempo de Manoj es muy estimulante,,en,Mientras cada uno de nuestros otros sentidos,,en,visión,,en,oler,,en,gusto y tacto,,en,son multidimensionales,,en,el tiempo parece ser unidimensional,,en,Comprender la interacción del tiempo con nuestros otros sentidos es un rompecabezas muy interesante.,,en,También abre la puerta a las posibilidades de existencia de otros fenómenos más allá de nuestro rango sensorial conocido.,,en,Manoj's transmite una comprensión profunda de la interacción de nuestra física,,en,sistemas de creencias humanas,,en,percepciones,,en,experiencias,,en,e incluso nuestros idiomas,,en,sobre cómo abordamos el descubrimiento científico,,en,Su trabajo te desafiará a repensar lo que crees que sabes que es verdad.,,en. This thought provoking work should be required reading to anyone embarking on a new scientific journey.”

“Manoj’s treatment of time is very thought provoking. While each of our other senses – sight, sonar, smell, taste and touch – are multi-dimensional, time appears to be single dimensional. Understanding the interplay of time with our other senses is a very interesting puzzle. It also opens to door to the existence possibilities of other phenomena beyond our know sensory range.”

“Manoj’s conveys a deep understanding of the interaction of our physics, human belief systems, perceptions, experiences, and even our languages, on how we approach scientific discovery. His work will challenge you to rethink what you think you know is true.”

“Manoj ofrece una perspectiva única de la ciencia.,,en,y realidad,,en,La comprensión de que la ciencia no conduce a la percepción.,,en,pero la percepción lleva a la ciencia,,en,es clave para entender que todo científico,,en,hechos,,en,están abiertos para la re-exploración,,en,Este libro es extremadamente estimulante y desafía a cada lector a cuestionar sus propias creencias.,,en,Manoj aborda la física desde una perspectiva holística,,en,La física no ocurre aisladamente,,en,pero se define en términos de nuestras experiencias,,en,tanto científico como espiritual,,en,A medida que explores su libro, desafiarás tus propias creencias y ampliarás tus horizontes.,,en,Blogs y encontrados en línea,,en,Desde el blog,,en,Através del espejo,,en,Este libro es considerablemente diferente de otros libros en su enfoque de la filosofía y la física.,,en, percepción, and reality. The realization that science does not lead to perception, but perception leads to science, is key to understanding that all scientific “facts” are open for re-exploration. This book is extremely thought provoking and challenges each reader the question their own beliefs.”

“Manoj approaches physics from a holistic perspective. Physics does not occur in isolation, but is defined in terms of our experiences – both scientific and spiritual. As you explore his book you’ll challenge your own beliefs and expand your horizons.”

Blogs and Found Online

From the Blog Through The Looking Glass

“This book is considerably different from other books in its approach to philosophy and physics. Contiene numerosos ejemplos prácticos sobre las profundas implicaciones de nuestro punto de vista filosófico sobre la física.,,en,específicamente astrofísica y física de partículas,,en,Cada demostración viene con un apéndice matemático,,en,que incluye una derivación más rigurosa y una explicación más detallada,,en,El libro incluso rienda en diversas ramas de la filosofía.,,en,pensando tanto en Oriente como en Occidente,,en,y tanto el período clásico como la filosofía contemporánea moderna,,en,Y es gratificante saber que todas las matemáticas y la física utilizadas en el libro son muy comprensibles.,,en,y afortunadamente no nivel de posgrado,,en,Eso ayuda a que sea mucho más fácil apreciar el libro.,,en,Desde el,,en,Páginas Hub,,en,Llamándose a sí mismo,,en,Una revisión honesta de,,en,esta revisión se parece a la utilizada en,,en,Recibí algunas reseñas de mis lectores por correo electrónico y foros en línea,,en, specifically astrophysics and particle physics. Each demonstration comes with a mathematical appendix, which includes a more rigorous derivation and further explanation. The book even reins in diverse branches of philosophy (e.g. thinking from both the East and the West, and both the classical period and modern contemporary philosophy). And it is gratifying to know that all the mathematics and physics used in the book are very understandable, and thankfully not graduate level. That helps to make it much easier to appreciate the book.”

From the Hub Pages

Calling itself “An Honest Review of El universo Unreal,” this review looks like the one used in los tiempos de los estrechos.

I got a few reviews from my readers through email and online forums. Los he compilado como reseñas anónimas en la siguiente página de esta publicación.,,en,Haga clic en el enlace de abajo para visitar la segunda página.,,en,Archivos de metafísica,,en.

Click on the link below to visit the second page.

El universo Unreal — Al ver la luz en Ciencia y Espiritualidad

Sabemos que nuestro universo es un poco irreal. Las estrellas que vemos en el cielo nocturno, por ejemplo, no están realmente allí. Ellos pueden haberse movido o incluso muerto en el momento en que llegamos a verlos. Este retraso se debe al tiempo que le toma a la luz de las estrellas y galaxias distantes para llegar hasta nosotros. Sabemos de este retraso.

El mismo retraso en ver tiene una manifestación menos conocido en la forma en que percibimos los objetos en movimiento. Se distorsiona nuestra percepción de tal manera que algo que viene hacia nosotros miraríamos como si se está llegando más rápido. Por extraño que pueda sonar, este efecto se ha observado en estudios astrofísicas. Algunos de los cuerpos celestes se ven como si estuvieran moviendo varias veces la velocidad de la luz, mientras que su “reales” velocidad es probablemente mucho menor.

Ahora, este efecto plantea una pregunta interesante–lo que es lo “reales” velocidad? Si ver es creer, la velocidad vemos debe ser la velocidad real. Entonces de nuevo, sabemos del efecto tiempo de viaje luz. Así que debemos corregir la velocidad que vemos antes de creer que. Entonces, ¿qué hace “ver” significará? Cuando decimos que vemos algo, ¿qué es lo que realmente queremos decir?

Luz en Física

Seeing implica luz, obviamente. La velocidad finita de la luz influye y distorsiona la forma de ver las cosas. Este hecho casi no debería ser una sorpresa, ya que sabemos que las cosas no son como las vemos. El sol que vemos que ya es de ocho minutos de edad para el momento en que lo vemos. Este retraso no es un gran problema; si queremos saber lo que está pasando en el sol ahora, todo lo que tenemos que hacer es esperar durante ocho minutos. Nosotros, sin embargo,, Tiene que “correcta” las distorsiones en la percepción debido a la velocidad finita de la luz antes de que podamos confiar en lo que vemos.

Lo que es sorprendente (y rara vez resaltado) es que cuando se trata de detectar el movimiento, no podemos respaldar a calcular de la misma manera sacamos la demora en ver el sol. Si vemos un cuerpo celeste que se mueve a una improbablemente alta velocidad, no podemos averiguar qué velocidad y en qué dirección es “realmente” moviéndose sin hacer supuestos adicionales. Una forma de manejar esta dificultad es atribuir las distorsiones en la percepción de las propiedades fundamentales de la arena de la física — espacio y el tiempo. Otra línea de acción es la de aceptar la desconexión entre nuestra percepción y la subyacente “realidad” y tratar con él de alguna manera.

Einstein eligió la primera ruta. Hace En su papel pionero más de cien años, introdujo la teoría especial de la relatividad, en lo que atribuyó las manifestaciones de la velocidad finita de la luz a las propiedades fundamentales de espacio y tiempo. Una idea central en la relatividad especial (SR) es que la noción de simultaneidad debe redefinirse porque toma algún tiempo para que la luz de un evento en un lugar lejano para llegar hasta nosotros, y nos hacemos conscientes del evento. El concepto de “Ahora” no tiene mucho sentido, como vimos, cuando hablamos de que ocurra un evento en el sol, por ejemplo. La simultaneidad es relativa.

Einstein definió simultaneidad utilizando los instantes en el tiempo que detectamos el evento. Detección, como él lo definió, implica un viaje de ida y vuelta de la luz similar a la detección por radar. Enviamos luz, y mirar la reflexión. Si la luz reflejada por dos acontecimientos que nos llega en el mismo instante, que son simultáneos.
Otra manera de definir la simultaneidad es usando sensores — podemos llamar a dos eventos simultáneos si la luz de ellos nos llega en el mismo instante. En otras palabras, podemos utilizar la luz generada por los objetos bajo observación en lugar de enviar la luz a ellos y mirando a la reflexión.

Esta diferencia puede sonar como un tecnicismo argucia, pero sí hacer una enorme diferencia en las predicciones que podemos hacer. Elección de Einstein resulta en una imagen matemática que tiene muchas propiedades deseables, lo que permitirá seguir el desarrollo elegante.

La otra posibilidad tiene una ventaja cuando se trata de describir los objetos en movimiento, ya que se corresponde mejor con la forma en que medimos. No utilizamos radar para ver las estrellas en movimiento; nos sentimos más que la luz (u otra radiación) viniendo de ellos. Pero esta opción de usar un paradigma sensorial, en lugar de detección de radar como, para describir los resultados del universo en una imagen matemática ligeramente más feo.

La diferencia matemática genera diferentes posturas filosóficas, que a su vez filtrarse a la comprensión de nuestra imagen física de la realidad. Como una ilustración, Veamos un ejemplo de la astrofísica. Supongamos que observamos (a través de un telescopio de radio, por ejemplo) dos objetos en el cielo, más o menos de la misma forma y propiedades. Lo único que sabemos con certeza es que las ondas de radio de dos puntos diferentes en el cielo alcanzan el radiotelescopio en el mismo instante en el tiempo. Podemos suponer que las olas comenzaron su viaje bastante hace un tiempo.

Para objetos simétricos, si suponemos (ya que rutinariamente hacemos) que las ondas comenzaron el viaje más o menos en el mismo instante en el tiempo, terminamos con una foto de dos “reales” lóbulos simétricos más o menos la forma de verlos.

Pero no es diferente posibilidad de que las olas se originó desde el mismo objeto (que está en movimiento) en dos instantes diferentes en el tiempo, alcanzando el telescopio en el mismo instante. Esta posibilidad explica algunas propiedades espectrales y temporales de dichas fuentes de radio simétricas, que es lo que matemáticamente describí en un artículo reciente de la física. Ahora, ¿cuál de estos dos cuadros debemos tomar como real? Dos objetos simétricos como los vemos o un objeto que se mueve de tal manera que nos dé esa impresión? ¿Realmente importa cuál es “reales”? ¿Tiene “reales” significa nada en este contexto?

La postura filosófica en implícita en la relatividad especial responde a esta pregunta de manera inequívoca. Hay una realidad física inequívoca de la cual obtenemos las dos fuentes de radio simétricas, aunque se necesita un poco de trabajo matemático para llegar a ella. Las matemáticas descarta la posibilidad de un único objeto que se mueve de una manera tal como para imitar dos objetos. Esencialmente, lo que vemos es lo que está ahí fuera.

Por otra parte, si definimos la simultaneidad mediante la llegada simultánea de luz, nos veremos obligados a admitir lo contrario. Lo que vemos es bastante lejos de lo que está ahí fuera. Vamos a confesar que no podemos desvincular de forma inequívoca las distorsiones debido a las limitaciones en la percepción (la velocidad finita de la luz siendo la restricción de interés aquí) de lo que vemos. Existen múltiples realidades físicas que pueden resultar en la misma imagen perceptual. La única postura filosófica que tiene sentido es la que se desconecta de la realidad detectada y las causas de lo que está siendo detectada.

Esta desconexión no es infrecuente en las escuelas filosóficas del pensamiento. Fenomenalismo, por ejemplo, sostiene la opinión de que el espacio y el tiempo no son realidades objetivas. Ellos no son más que el medio de nuestra percepción. Todos los fenómenos que ocurren en el espacio y el tiempo no son más que haces de nuestra percepción. En otras palabras, espacio y el tiempo son construcciones cognitivas surgen de la percepción. Así, todas las propiedades físicas que atribuimos al espacio y el tiempo sólo se pueden aplicar a la realidad fenoménica (la realidad tal como la percibimos). La realidad noumenal (que mantiene las causas físicas de nuestra percepción), por el contrario, queda fuera de nuestro alcance cognitivo.

Las ramificaciones de las dos posturas filosóficas diferentes descritos anteriormente son enormes. Desde la física moderna parece abrazar una visión no phenomenalistic de espacio y tiempo, que se encuentra en desacuerdo con esa rama de la filosofía. Este abismo entre la filosofía y la física ha crecido a tal grado que el premio Nobel físico ganador, Steven Weinberg, preguntado (en su libro “Sueños de una Teoría Final de”) ¿por qué la contribución de la filosofía a la física han sido tan sorprendentemente pequeño. También pide a los filósofos a hacer declaraciones como, “La realidad noumenal Ya sea 'provoca la realidad fenoménica’ o si la "realidad noumenal es independiente de nuestra sintiéndola’ o si "percibimos la realidad noumenal,’ el problema es que el concepto de la realidad noumenal es un concepto totalmente redundante para el análisis de la ciencia.”

Uno, casi accidental, dificultad en la redefinición de los efectos de la velocidad finita de la luz, como las propiedades del espacio y el tiempo es que cualquier efecto que nosotros entendemos consigue al instante relegado al reino de las ilusiones ópticas. Por ejemplo, el retraso de ocho minutos en ver el sol, porque fácilmente entendemos y distanciamos de nuestra percepción usando aritmética simple, se considera una mera ilusión óptica. Sin embargo, las distorsiones en la percepción de objetos en movimiento rápido, aunque originario de la misma fuente se considera una propiedad del espacio y el tiempo, ya que son más complejos.

Tenemos que llegar a un acuerdo con el hecho de que cuando se trata de ver el universo, no hay tal cosa como una ilusión óptica, que es probablemente lo que Goethe señaló cuando dijo, “Ilusión óptica es verdad óptica.”

La distinción (o falta de ella) entre la ilusión óptica y la verdad es uno de los debates más antiguos de la filosofía. Después de todo, se trata de la distinción entre el conocimiento y la realidad. El conocimiento es considerado nuestro punto de vista sobre algo que, en la realidad, es “realmente el caso.” En otras palabras, el conocimiento es un reflejo, o una imagen mental de algo externo, como se muestra en la siguiente figura.
Commonsense view of reality
En esta foto, la flecha negro representa el proceso de creación de conocimiento, que incluye la percepción, actividades cognitivas, y el ejercicio de la razón pura. Esta es la imagen que la física ha llegado a aceptar.
Alternate view of reality
Si bien reconoce que nuestra percepción puede ser imperfecta, la física supone que podemos conseguir más y más a la realidad externa a través de la experimentación cada vez más fino, y, más importante, mediante una mejor teorización. Las teorías especial y general de la relatividad son ejemplos de brillantes aplicaciones de esta visión de la realidad donde los principios físicos simples son implacablemente perseguidos usando formidable máquina de la razón pura a sus conclusiones lógicamente inevitables.

Pero hay otra, visión alternativa del conocimiento y de la realidad que ha existido durante mucho tiempo. Esta es la opinión de que se refiere a la realidad percibida como una representación cognitiva interna de nuestras entradas sensoriales, como se ilustra a continuación.

En este punto de vista, conocimiento y la realidad percibida son dos constructos cognitivos internos, aunque hemos llegado a pensar en ellos como algo separado. Lo que es externo no es la realidad tal como la percibimos, sino una entidad incognoscible dando origen a las causas físicas detrás de los estímulos sensoriales. En la ilustración, la primera flecha representa el proceso de detección, y la segunda flecha representa los pasos de razonamiento cognitivo y lógicas. Para la aplicación de esta visión de la realidad y el conocimiento, tenemos que adivinar la naturaleza de la realidad absoluta, incognoscible, ya que es. Un posible candidato para la realidad absoluta es la mecánica newtoniana, que da una predicción razonable para nuestra realidad percibida.

En resumen, cuando tratamos de manejar las distorsiones debidas a la percepción, tenemos dos opciones, o dos posibles posturas filosóficas. Una es aceptar las distorsiones como parte de nuestro espacio y el tiempo, como SR hace. La otra opción es asumir que existe una “mayor” realidad distinta de nuestra realidad detectada, cuyas propiedades sólo podemos conjeturar. En otras palabras, una opción es vivir con la distorsión, mientras que la otra es la de proponer conjeturas de la realidad superior. Ninguna de estas opciones es particularmente atractivo. Pero el camino adivinar es similar a la vista aceptado en phenomenalism. También conduce naturalmente a la forma de ver la realidad de la neurociencia cognitiva, que estudia los mecanismos biológicos detrás de la cognición.

En mi opinión, las dos opciones no son intrínsecamente distinta. La postura filosófica de SR puede ser pensado como proveniente de una comprensión profunda de que el espacio no es más que una construcción fenomenal. Si la modalidad sensorial introduce distorsiones en la imagen fenomenal, podemos argumentar que una forma sensata de manejarlo es redefinir las propiedades de la realidad fenoménica.

Papel de la Luz en nuestra realidad

Desde la perspectiva de la neurociencia cognitiva, todo lo que vemos, sentido, sentir y pensar es el resultado de las interconexiones neuronales en nuestro cerebro y las pequeñas señales eléctricas en ellos. Esta visión debe ser correcto. ¿Qué más hay? Todos nuestros pensamientos y preocupaciones, conocimientos y creencias, ego y la realidad, vida y la muerte — todo está despidos meramente neuronales en el medio y kilogramos de empalagoso, materia gris, que es nuestro cerebro. No hay nada más. Nada!

De hecho, esta visión de la realidad en la neurociencia es un eco exacto de fenomenalismo, que considera todo un haz de percepción o mentales construcciones. El espacio y el tiempo también son construcciones cognitivas en el cerebro, como todo lo demás. Son imágenes mentales que nuestros cerebros se inventan de los estímulos sensoriales que nuestros sentidos reciben. Generado a partir de nuestra percepción sensorial y fabricado por nuestro proceso cognitivo, el continuo espacio-tiempo es el ámbito de la física. De todos nuestros sentidos, la vista es, con mucho, el dominante. La información sensorial a la vista es la luz. En un espacio creado por el cerebro de la luz que cae sobre nuestras retinas (o en los fotosensores del telescopio Hubble), ¿es una sorpresa que nada puede viajar más rápido que la luz?

Esta postura filosófica es la base de mi libro, El universo Unreal, que explora los elementos comunes de la física y la filosofía de unión. Tales reflexiones filosóficas generalmente tienen una mala reputación desde nosotros los físicos. Para los físicos, la filosofía es un campo totalmente diferente, otro silo de conocimientos. Tenemos que cambiar esta creencia y apreciamos el solapamiento entre los diferentes silos de conocimiento. Es en esta superposición que podemos esperar encontrar avances en el pensamiento humano.

Este filosófica grand-pie puede sonar presuntuoso y la auto-admonición velada de físicos comprensiblemente no deseados; pero yo tengo en la mano una carta de triunfo. Basándose en esta postura filosófica, Yo he venido para arriba con un modelo radicalmente nuevo por dos fenómenos astrofísicos, y lo publicó en un artículo titulado, “Son fuentes de radio y explosiones de rayos gamma Luminal Plumas?” en la conocida revista International Journal of Modern Physics D en junio 2007. Este artículo, que pronto se convirtió en uno de los mejores artículos que se accede de la revista de Jan 2008, es una aplicación directa de la opinión de que la velocidad finita de la luz distorsiona la forma en que percibimos el movimiento. Debido a estas distorsiones, la forma de ver las cosas es muy lejos de la forma en que son.

Podemos estar tentados a pensar que podemos escapar de esas limitaciones perceptivas utilizando extensiones tecnológicas a nuestros sentidos como radiotelescopios, microscopios electrónicos o mediciones de velocidad espectroscópica. Después de todo, estos instrumentos no tienen “percepción” per se y debe ser inmune a las debilidades humanas que sufrimos desde. Pero estos instrumentos sin alma también miden nuestro universo utilizando soportes de información se limita a la velocidad de la luz. Nosotros, por lo tanto,, no puede escapar de las limitaciones básicas de nuestra percepción incluso cuando usamos instrumentos modernos. En otras palabras, el telescopio Hubble puede ver de mil millones de años luz más lejos que nuestros ojos desnudos, pero lo que ve es todavía un billón de años más que lo que ven nuestros ojos.

Nuestra realidad, si tecnológicamente mejorado o construido sobre las entradas sensoriales directos, es el resultado final de nuestro proceso perceptual. En la medida en que nuestra percepción de largo alcance se basa en la luz (Por lo tanto, y se limita a su velocidad), obtenemos sólo una imagen distorsionada del universo.

Luz en Filosofía y Espiritualidad

El giro a esta historia de la luz y la realidad es que parece que hemos sabido todo esto por un largo tiempo. Escuelas filosóficas clásicas parecen haber pensado de forma muy similar al experimento mental de Einstein.

Una vez que apreciamos el lugar especial concedido a la luz de la ciencia moderna, tenemos que preguntarnos cómo nuestro universo diferente hubiera sido en ausencia de luz. Por supuesto, la luz es sólo una etiqueta que atribuimos a una experiencia sensorial. Por lo tanto, para ser más exactos, tenemos que hacer una pregunta diferente: si no tenemos sentidos que respondieron a lo que llamamos luz, afectaría eso a la forma del universo?

La respuesta inmediata de cualquier normales (es decir, no filosófica) persona es que es obvio. Si todo el mundo es ciego, todo el mundo es ciego. Pero la existencia del universo es independiente de que podemos ver o no. Es sin embargo? ¿Qué significa decir que el universo existe si no podemos sentirlo? De… el enigma milenario de la caída del árbol en un bosque desierto. Recordar, el universo es un constructo cognitivo o una representación mental de la entrada de luz a nuestros ojos. No lo es “por ahí,” pero en las neuronas de nuestro cerebro, como todo lo demás es. En ausencia de la luz en nuestros ojos, no hay entrada de estar representados, ergo hay universo.

Si hubiéramos sentido el universo utilizando modalidades que operaban a otras velocidades (ecolocalización, por ejemplo), es esas velocidades que habrían figurado en las propiedades fundamentales de espacio y tiempo. Esta es la conclusión ineludible de fenomenalismo.

El papel de la luz en la creación de nuestra realidad o universo está en el centro del pensamiento religioso occidental. Un universo desprovisto de luz no es simplemente un mundo donde usted ha apagado las luces. De hecho, es un universo carente de sí mismo, un universo que no existe. Es en este contexto que tenemos que entender la sabiduría detrás de la afirmación de que “la tierra estaba desordenada, y sin efecto” hasta que Dios hizo la luz para ser, diciendo “Hágase la luz.”

El Corán también dice, “Allah es la luz de los cielos y la tierra,” que se refleja en una de las antiguas escrituras hindúes: “Llévame de la oscuridad a la luz, me llevan de lo irreal a lo real.” El papel de la luz en la que nos lleva desde el vacío irreal (la nada) a una realidad de hecho se entiende por un largo, mucho tiempo. ¿Es posible que los antiguos santos y profetas sabían cosas que sólo ahora estamos empezando a descubrir con todos nuestros supuestos avances en el conocimiento?

Sé que puedo pensaré en donde los ángeles temen pisar, para reinterpretar las Escrituras es un juego peligroso. Tales interpretaciones extranjeros rara vez son bienvenidos en los círculos teológicos. Pero me refugio en el hecho de que estoy en busca de concurrencia en los puntos de vista metafísicos de las filosofías espirituales, sin disminuir su valor místico o teológica.

Los paralelismos entre la distinción nouménico fenomenal en el fenomenalismo y la distinción Brahman-Maya en Advaita son difíciles de ignorar. Esta sabiduría probada por el tiempo en la naturaleza de la realidad del repertorio de la espiritualidad está reinventado en la neurociencia moderna, que trata la realidad como una representación cognitiva creada por el cerebro. El cerebro utiliza los estímulos sensoriales, memoria, conciencia, e incluso el lenguaje como ingredientes en inventar nuestro sentido de la realidad. Esta visión de la realidad, sin embargo, es algo que la física está aún por llegar a un acuerdo con. Pero en la medida en que su ámbito (espacio y el tiempo) es una parte de la realidad, la física no es inmune a la filosofía.

A medida que empujamos los límites de nuestro conocimiento cada vez más, estamos empezando a descubrir las interconexiones insospechadas ya menudo sorprendentes entre las diferentes ramas de los esfuerzos humanos. En el análisis final, ¿cómo pueden los diversos ámbitos de nuestro conocimiento ser independientes entre sí cuando todo nuestro conocimiento reside en nuestro cerebro? El conocimiento es una representación cognitiva de nuestras experiencias. Pero a continuación,, así es la realidad; es una representación cognitiva de nuestras entradas sensoriales. Es una falacia pensar que el conocimiento es la representación interna de una realidad externa, y por lo tanto distinta de ella. El conocimiento y la realidad son dos constructos cognitivos internos, aunque hemos llegado a pensar en ellos como algo separado.

Reconociendo y haciendo uso de las interconexiones entre los distintos ámbitos de la actividad humana puede ser el catalizador para el próximo gran avance en nuestra sabiduría colectiva que hemos estado esperando.

The Philosophy of Special Relativity — A Comparison between Indian and Western Interpretations

Resumen: The Western philosophical phenomenalism could be treated as a kind of philosophical basis of the special theory of relativity. The perceptual limitations of our senses hold the key to the understanding of relativistic postulates. The specialness of the speed of light in our phenomenal space and time is more a matter of our perceptual apparatus, than an input postulate to the special theory of relativity. The author believes that the parallels among the phenomenological, Western spiritual and the Eastern Advaita interpretations of special relativity point to an exciting possibility of unifying the Eastern and Western schools of thought to some extent.

– Editor

Key Words: Relativity, Speed of Light, Fenomenalismo, Advaita.

Introducción

The philosophical basis of the special theory of relativity can be interpreted in terms of Western phenomenalism, which views space and time are considered perceptual and cognitive constructs created out our sensory inputs. Desde esta perspectiva, the special status of light and its speed can be understood through a phenomenological study of our senses and the perceptual limitations to our phenomenal notions of space and time. A similar view is echoed in the BrahmanMaya distinción en Advaita. If we think of space and time as part of Maya, we can partly understand the importance that the speed of light in our reality, as enshrined in special relativity. The central role of light in our reality is highlighted in the Bible as well. These remarkable parallels among the phenomenological, Western spiritual and the Advaita interpretations of special relativity point to an exciting possibility of unifying the Eastern and Western schools of thought to a certain degree.

Special Relativity

Einstein unveiled his special theory of relativity2 a little over a century ago. In his theory, he showed that space and time were not absolute entities. They are entities relative to an observer. An observer’s space and time are related to those of another through the speed of light. Por ejemplo, nothing can travel faster than the speed of light. In a moving system, time flows slower and space contracts in accordance with equations involving the speed of light. Luz, por lo tanto,, enjoys a special status in our space and time. This specialness of light in our reality is indelibly enshrined in the special theory of relativity.

Where does this specialness come from? What is so special about light that its speed should figure in the basic structure of space and time and our reality? This question has remained unanswered for over 100 años. It also brings in the metaphysical aspects of space and time, which form the basis of what we perceive as reality.

Noumenal-Phenomenal and BrahmanMaya Distinctions

En el Advaita3 view of reality, what we perceive is merely an illusion-Maya. Advaita explicitly renounces the notion that the perceived reality is external or indeed real. It teaches us that the phenomenal universe, our conscious awareness of it, and our bodily being are all an illusion or Maya. They are not the true, absolute reality. The absolute reality existing in itself, independent of us and our experiences, es Brahman.

A similar view of reality is echoed in phenomenalism,4 which holds that space and time are not objective realities. Ellos no son más que el medio de nuestra percepción. En este punto de vista, all the phenomena that happen in space and time are merely bundles of our perception. Space and time are also cognitive constructs arising from perception. Así, the reasons behind all the physical properties that we ascribe to space and time have to be sought in the sensory processes that create our perception, whether we approach the issue from the Advaita or phenomenalism perspective.

This analysis of the importance of light in our reality naturally brings in the metaphysical aspects of space and time. In Kant’s view,5 space and time are pure forms of intuition. They do not arise from our experience because our experiences presuppose the existence of space and time. Así, we can represent space and time in the absence of objects, but we cannot represent objects in the absence of space and time.

Kant’s middle-ground has the advantage of reconciling the views of Newton and Leibniz. It can agree with Newton’s view6 that space is absolute and real for phenomenal objects open to scientific investigation. It can also sit well with Leibniz’s view7 that space is not absolute and has an existence only in relation to objects, by highlighting their relational nature, not among objects in themselves (noumenal objects), but between observers and objects.

We can roughly equate the noumenal objects to forms in Brahman and our perception of them to Maya. En este artículo, we will use the terms “noumenal reality,” “absolute reality,” o “realidad física” interchangeably to describe the collection of noumenal objects, their properties and interactions, which are thought to be the underlying causes of our perception. Del mismo modo, we will “phenomenal reality,” “perceived or sensed reality,” y “perceptual reality” to signify our reality as we perceive it.

As with Brahman causing Maya, we assume that the phenomenal notions of space and time arise from noumenal causes8 through our sensory and cognitive processes. Note that this causality assumption is ad-hoc; there is no a priori reason for phenomenal reality to have a cause, nor is causation a necessary feature of the noumenal reality. Despite this difficulty, we proceed from a naive model for the noumenal reality and show that, through the process of perception, podemos “derivar” a phenomenal reality that obeys the special theory of relativity.

This attempt to go from the phenomena (espacio y el tiempo) to the essence of what we experience (a model for noumenal reality) is roughly in line with Husserl’s transcendental phenomenology.9 The deviation is that we are more interested in the manifestations of the model in the phenomenal reality itself rather than the validity of the model for the essence. Through this study, we show that the specialness of the speed of light in our phenomenal space and time is a consequence of our perceptual apparatus. It doesn’t have to be an input postulate to the special theory of relativity.

Perception and Phenomenal Reality

The properties we ascribe to space and time (such as the specialness of the speed of light) can only be a part of our perceived reality or Maya, en Advaita, not of the underlying absolute reality, Brahman. If we think of space and time as aspects of our perceived reality arising from an unknowable Brahman through our sensory and cognitive processes, we can find an explanation for the special distinction of the speed of light in the process and mechanism of our sensing. Our thesis is that the reason for the specialness of light in our phenomenal notions of space and time is hidden in the process of our perception.

Nosotros, por lo tanto,, study how the noumenal objects around us generate our sensory signals, and how we construct our phenomenal reality out of these signals in our brains. The first part is already troublesome because noumenal objects, por definición, have no properties or interactions that we can study or understand.

These features of the noumenal reality are identical to the notion of Brahman en Advaita, which highlights that the ultimate truth is Brahman, the one beyond time, space and causation. Brahman is the material cause of the universe, but it transcends the cosmos. It transcends time; it exists in the past, present and future. It transcends space; it has no beginning, middle and end. It even transcends causality. For that reason, Brahman is incomprehensible to the human mind. The way it manifests to us is through our sensory and cognitive processes. This manifestation is Maya, the illusion, que, in the phenomenalistic parlance, corresponds to the phenomenal reality.

For our purpose in this article, we describe our sensory and cognitive process and the creation of the phenomenal reality or Maya10 as follows. It starts with the noumenal objects (or forms in Brahman), which generate the inputs to our senses. Our senses then process the signals and relay the processed electric data corresponding to them to our brain. The brain creates a cognitive model, a representation of the sensory inputs, and presents it to our conscious awareness as reality, which is our phenomenal world or Maya.

This description of how the phenomenal reality created ushers in a tricky philosophical question. Who or what creates the phenomenal reality and where? It is not created by our senses, brain and mind because these are all objects or forms in the phenomenal reality. The phenomenal reality cannot create itself. It cannot be that the noumenal reality creates the phenomenal reality because, in that case, it would be inaccurate to assert the cognitive inaccessibility to the noumenal world.

This philosophical trouble is identical in Advaita así. Our senses, brain and mind cannot create Maya, because they are all part of Maya. Si Brahman created Maya, it would have to be just as real. This philosophical quandary can be circumvented in the following way. We assume that all events and objects in Maya have a cause or form in Brahman or in the noumenal world. Así, we postulate that our senses, mind and body all have some (unknown) forms in Brahman (or in the noumenal world), and these forms create Maya in our conscious awareness, ignoring the fact that our consciousness itself is an illusory manifestation in the phenomenal world. This inconsistency is not material to our exploration into the nature of space and time because we are seeking the reason for the specialness of light in the sensory process rather than at the level of consciousness.

Space and time together form what physics considers the basis of reality. Space makes up our visual reality precisely as sounds make up our auditory world. Just as sounds are a perceptual experience rather than a fundamental property of physical reality, space also is an experience, or a cognitive representation of the visual inputs, not a fundamental aspect of Brahman or the noumenal reality. The phenomenal reality thus created is Maya. La Maya events are an imperfect or distorted representation of the corresponding Brahman events. Desde Brahman is a superset of Maya (o, equivalently, our senses are potentially incapable of sensing all aspects of the noumenal reality), not all objects and events in Brahman create a projection in Maya. Our perception (o Maya) is thus limited because of the sense modality and its speed, which form the focus of our investigation in this article.

In summary, it can be argued that the noumenal-phenomenal distinction in phenomenalism is an exact parallel to the BrahmanMaya distinción en Advaita if we think of our perceived reality (o Maya) as arising from sensory and cognitive processes.

Sensing Space and Time, and the Role of Light

The phenomenal notions of space and time together form what physics considers the basis of reality. Since we take the position that space and time are the end results of our sensory perception, we can understand some of the limitations in our Maya by studying the limitations in our senses themselves.

At a fundamental level, how do our senses work? Our sense of sight operates using light, and the fundamental interaction involved in sight falls in the electromagnetic (EM) category because light (or photon) is the intermediary of EM interactions.11

The exclusivity of EM interaction is not limited to our long-range sense of sight; all the short-range senses (toque, taste, smell and hearing) are also EM in nature. In physics, the fundamental interactions are modeled as fields with gauge bosons.12 In quantum electrodynamics13 (the quantum field theory of EM interactions), photon (or light) is the gauge boson mediating EM interactions. Electromagnetic interactions are responsible for all our sensory inputs. To understand the limitations of our perception of space, we need not highlight the EM nature of all our senses. Space is, en gran, the result of our sight sense. But it is worthwhile to keep in mind that we would have no sensing, and indeed no reality, in the absence of EM interactions.

Like our senses, all our technological extensions to our senses (such as radio telescopes, electron microscopes, red shift measurements and even gravitational lensing) use EM interactions exclusively to measure our universe. Así, we cannot escape the basic constraints of our perception even when we use modern instruments. The Hubble telescope may see a billion light years farther than our naked eyes, pero lo que ve es todavía un billón de años más que lo que ven nuestros ojos. Our phenomenal reality, whether built upon direct sensory inputs or technologically enhanced, is made up of a subset of EM particles and interactions only. What we perceive as reality is a subset of forms and events in the noumenal world corresponding to EM interactions, filtered through our sensory and cognitive processes. En el Advaita parlance, Maya can be thought of as a projection of Brahman through EM interactions into our sensory and cognitive space, quite probably an imperfect projection.

The exclusivity of EM interactions in our perceived reality is not always appreciated, mainly because of a misconception that we can sense gravity directly. This confusion arises because our bodies are subject to gravity. There is a fine distinction between “being subject to” y “being able to sense” gravitational force. The gravity sensing in our ears measures the effect of gravity on EM matter. In the absence of EM interaction, it is impossible to sense gravity, or anything else for that matter.

This assertion that there is no sensing in the absence of EM interactions brings us to the next philosophical hurdle. One can always argue that, in the absence of EM interaction, there is no matter to sense. This argument is tantamount to insisting that the noumenal world consists of only those forms and events that give rise to EM interaction in our phenomenal perception. En otras palabras, it is the same as insisting that Brahman is made up of only EM interactions. What is lacking in the absence of EM interaction is only our phenomenal reality. En el Advaita notion, in the absence of sensing, Maya does not exist. The absolute reality or Brahman, sin embargo, is independent of our sensing it. De nuevo, we see that the Eastern and Western views on reality we explored in this article are remarkably similar.

The Speed of Light

Knowing that our space-time is a representation of the light waves our eyes receive, we can immediately see that light is indeed special in our reality. In our view, sensory perception leads to our brain’s representation that we call reality, o Maya. Any limitation in this chain of sensing leads to a corresponding limitation in our phenomenal reality.

One limitation in the chain from senses to perception is the finite speed of photon, which is the gauge boson of our senses. The finite speed of the sense modality influences and distorts our perception of motion, espacio y el tiempo. Because these distortions are perceived as a part of our reality itself, the root cause of the distortion becomes a fundamental property of our reality. This is how the speed of light becomes such an important constant in our space-time.

The importance of the speed of light, sin embargo, is respected only in our phenomenal Maya. Other modes of perception have other speeds the figure as the fundamental constant in their space-like perception. The reality sensed through echolocation, por ejemplo, has the speed of sound as a fundamental property. De hecho, it is fairly simple to establish14 that echolocation results in a perception of motion that obeys something very similar to special relativity with the speed of light replaced with that of sound.

Theories beyond Sensory Limits

The basis of physics is the world view called scientific realism, which is not only at the core of sciences but is our natural way of looking at the world as well. Scientific realism, and hence physics, assume an independently existing external world, whose structures are knowable through scientific investigations. To the extent observations are based on perception, the philosophical stance of scientific realism, as it is practiced today, can be thought of as a trust in our perceived reality, and as an assumption that it is this reality that needs to be explored in science.

Physics extends its reach beyond perception or Maya through the rational element of pure theory. Most of physics works in this “extended” intellectual reality, with concepts such as fields, forces, light rays, átomos, partículas, etc., the existence of which is insisted upon through the metaphysical commitment implied in scientific realism. Sin embargo, it does not claim that the rational extensions are the noumenal causes or Brahman giving raise to our phenomenal perception.

Scientific realism has helped physics tremendously, with all its classical theories. Sin embargo, scientific realism and the trust in our perception of reality should apply only within the useful ranges of our senses. Within the ranges of our sensory perceptions, we have fairly intuitive physics. An example of an intuitive picture is Newtonian mechanics that describe “normal” objects moving around at “normal” speeds.

When we get closer to the edges of our sensory modalities, we have to modify our sciences to describe the reality as we sense it. These modifications lead to different, and possibly incompatible, theories. When we ascribe the natural limitations of our senses and the consequent limitations of our perception (and therefore observations) to the fundamental nature of reality itself, we end up introducing complications in our physical laws. Depending on which limitations we are incorporating into the theory (e.g., small size, large speeds etc.), we may end up with theories that are incompatible with each other.

Our argument is that some of these complications (y, con suerte, incompatibilities) can be avoided if we address the sensory limitations directly. Por ejemplo, we can study the consequence of the fact that our senses operate at the speed of light as follows. We can model Brahman (the noumenal reality) as obeying classical mechanics, and work out what kind of Maya (phenomenal reality) we will experience through the chain of sensing.

The modeling of the noumenal world (as obeying classical mechanics), por supuesto, has shaky philosophical foundations. But the phenomenal reality predicted from this model is remarkably close to the reality we do perceive. Starting from this simple model, it can be easily shown our perception of motion at high speeds obeys special relativity.

The effects due to the finite speed of light are well known in physics. Sabemos, por ejemplo, that what we see happening in distant stars and galaxies now actually took place quite awhile ago. A more “advanced” effect due to the light travel time15 is the way we perceive motion at high speeds, which is the basis of special relativity. De hecho, many astrophysical phenomena can be understood16 in terms of light travel time effects. Because our sense modality is based on light, our sensed picture of motion has the speed of light appearing naturally in the equations describing it. So the importance of the speed of light in our space-time (as described in special relativity) is due to the fact that our reality is Maya created based on light inputs.

Conclusion

Almost all branches of philosophy grapple with this distinction between the phenomenal and the absolute realities to some extent. Advaita Vedanta holds the unrealness of the phenomenal reality as the basis of their world view. En este artículo, we showed that the views in phenomenalism can be thought of as a restatement of the Advaita postulates.

When such a spiritual or philosophical insight makes its way into science, great advances in our understanding can be expected. This convergence of philosophy (or even spirituality) and science is beginning to take place, most notably in neuroscience, which views reality as a creation of our brain, echoing the notion of Maya.

Science gives a false impression that we can get arbitrarily close to the underlying physical causes through the process of scientific investigation and rational theorization. An example of such theorization can be found in our sensation of hearing. The experience or the sensation of sound is an incredibly distant representation of the physical cause–namely air pressure waves. We are aware of the physical cause because we have a more powerful sight sense. So it would seem that we can indeed go from Maya (sonar) to the underlying causes (air pressure waves).

Sin embargo, it is a fallacy to assume that the physical cause (the air pressure waves) es Brahman. Air pressure waves are still a part of our perception; they are part of the intellectual picture we have come to accept. This intellectual picture is an extension of our visual reality, based on our trust in the visual reality. It is still a part of Maya.

The new extension of reality proposed in this article, again an intellectual extension, is an educated guess. We guess a model for the absolute reality, o Brahman, and predict what the consequent perceived reality should be, working forward through the chain of sensing and creating Maya. If the predicted perception is a good match with the Maya we do experience, then the guesswork for Brahman is taken to be a fairly accurate working model. The consistency between the predicted perception and what we do perceive is the only validation of the model for the nature of the absolute reality. Además, the guess is only one plausible model for the absolute reality; there may be different such “solutions” to the absolute reality all of which end up giving us our perceived reality.

It is a mistake to think of the qualities of our subjective experience of sound as the properties of the underlying physical process. In an exact parallel, it is a fallacy to assume that the subjective experience of space and time is the fundamental property of the world we live in. The space-time continuum, as we see it or feel it, is only a partial and incomplete representation of the unknowable Brahman. If we are willing to model the unknowable Brahman as obeying classical mechanics, we can indeed derive the properties of our perceived reality (such as time dilation, length contraction, light speed ceiling and so on in special relativity). By proposing this model for the noumenal world, we are not suggesting that all the effects of special relativity are mere perceptual artifacts. We are merely reiterating a known fact that space and time themselves cannot be anything but perceptual constructs. Thus their properties are manifestations of the process of perception.

When we consider processes close to or beyond our sensor limits, the manifestations of our perceptual and cognitive constraints become significant. Por lo tanto, when it comes to the physics that describes such processes, we really have to take into account the role that our perception and cognition play in sensing them. The universe as we see it is only a cognitive model created out of the photons falling on our retina or on the photosensors of the Hubble telescope. Debido a la velocidad finita del soporte de información (namely light), our perception is distorted in such a way as to give us the impression that space and time obey special relativity. Hacen, but space and time are only a part of our perception of an unknowable reality—a perception limited by the speed of light.

The central role of light in creating our reality or universe is at the heart of western spiritual philosophy as well. Un universo desprovisto de luz no es simplemente un mundo donde usted ha apagado las luces. De hecho, es un universo carente de sí mismo, un universo que no existe. It is in this context that we have to understand the wisdom behind the notion that “la tierra estaba desordenada, and void'” hasta que Dios hizo la luz para ser, diciendo “Hágase la luz.” Quran also says, “Allah is the light of the heavens.” The role of light in taking us from the void (la nada) to a reality was understood for a long, mucho tiempo. Is it possible that the ancient saints and prophets knew things that we are only now beginning to uncover with all our advances in knowledge? Whether we use old Eastern Advaita views or their Western counterparts, we can interpret the philosophical stance behind special relativity as hidden in the distinction between our phenomenal reality and its unknowable physical causes.

Referencias

  1. Dr. Manoj Thulasidas graduated from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Madras, en 1987. He studied fundamental particles and interactions at the CLEO collaboration at Cornell University during 1990-1992. After receiving his PhD in 1993, he moved to Marseilles, France and continued his research with the ALEPH collaboration at CERN, Geneva. During his ten-year career as a research scientist in the field of High energy physics, fue co-autor de más de 200 publicaciones.
  2. Einstein, A. (1905). Zur Elektrodynamik bewegter Körper. (On The Electrodynamics Of Moving Bodies). Anales de la Física, 17, 891-921.
  3. Radhakrishnan, S. & Moore, C. A. (1957). Source Book in Indian Philosophy. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NY.
  4. Chisolm, R. (1948). The Problem of Empiricism. The Journal of Philosophy, 45, 512-517.
  5. Allison, H. (2004). Kant’s Transcendental Idealism. Yale University Press.
  6. Rynasiewicz, R. (1995). By Their Properties, Causes and Effects: Newton’s Scholium on Time, Espacio, Place and Motion. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, 26, 133-153, 295-321.
  7. Calkins, M. En. (1897). Kant’s Conception of the Leibniz Space and Time Doctrine. The Philosophical Review, 6 (4), 356-369.
  8. Janaway, C., ed. (1999). The Cambridge Companion to Schopenhauer. Cambridge University Press.
  9. Schmitt, R. (1959). Husserl’s Transcendental-Phenomenological Reduction. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 20 (2), 238-245.
  10. Thulasidas, M. (2007). El universo Unreal. Asian Books, Singapur.
  11. Electromagnetic (EM) interaction is one of the four kinds of interactions in the Standard Model (Griffths, 1987) of particle physics. It is the interaction between charged bodies. Despite the EM repulsion between them, sin embargo, the protons stay confined within the nucleus because of the strong interaction, whose magnitude is much bigger than that of EM interactions. The other two interactions are termed the weak interaction and the gravitational interaction.
  12. In quantum field theory, every fundamental interaction consists of emitting a particle and absorbing it in an instant. These so-called virtual particles emitted and absorbed are known as the gauge bosons that mediate the interactions.
  13. Feynman, R. (1985). Quantum Electrodynamics. Addison Wesley.
  14. Thulasidas, M. (2007). El universo Unreal. Asian Books, Singapur.
  15. Rees, M. (1966). Appearance of Relativistically Expanding Radio Sources. Naturaleza, 211, 468-470.
  16. Thulasidas, M. (2007un). Son fuentes de radio y explosiones de rayos gamma Luminal Plumas? International Journal of Modern Physics D, 16 (6), 983-1000.

1984

All great books have one thing in common. They present deep philosophical inquiries, often clad in superb story lines. Or is it just my proclivity to see philosophy where none exists?

En 1984, the immediate story is of a completely totalitarian regime. Inwardly, 1984 is also about ethics and politics. It doesn’t end there, but goes into nested philosophical inquiries about how everything is eventually connected to metaphysics. It naturally ends up in solipsism, not merely in the material, metaphysical sense, but also in a spiritual, socio-psychological sense where the only hope, the only desired outcome of life, becomes death.

I think I may be giving away too much of my impressions in the first paragraph. Let’s take it step by step. We all know that totalitarianism is bad. It is a bad political system, we believe. The badness of totalitarianism can present itself at different levels of our social existence.

At the lowest level, it can be a control over our physical movements, physical freedom, and restrictions on what you can or cannot do. Try voting against a certain African “president” and you get beaten up, por ejemplo. Try leaving certain countries, you get shot.

At a higher level, totalitarianism can be about financial freedom. Think of those in the developed world who have to juggle three jobs just to put food on the table. At a progressively subtler level, totalitarianism is about control of information. Example: media conglomerates filtering and coloring all the news and information we receive.

At the highest level, totalitarianism is a fight for your mind, your soul, and your spiritual existence. 1984 presents a dystopia where totalitarianism is complete, irrevocable, and existing at all levels from physical to spiritual.

Another book of the same dystopian kind is The Handmaid’s Tale, where a feminist’s nightmare of a world is portrayed. Aquí, the focus is on religious extremism, and the social and sexual subjugation brought about by it. But the portrayal of the world gone hopelessly totalitarian is similar to 1984.

Also portraying a dark dystopia is V for Vendentta, with torture and terrorism thrown in. This work is probably inspired by 1984, I have to look it up.

It is the philosophical points in 1984 that make it the classic it is. The past, por ejemplo, is a matter of convention. If everybody believes (or is forced to believe) that events took place in a certain way, then that is the past. History is written by the victors. Knowing that, how can you trust the greatness of the victors or the evil in the vanquished? Assume for a second that Hitler had actually won the Second World War. Do you think we would’ve still thought of him as evil? I think we would probably think of him as the father of the modern world or something. Por supuesto, we would be having this conversation (if we were allowed to exist and have conversations at all) in German.

Even at a personal level, the past is not as immutable as it seems. Truth is relative. Lies repeated often enough become truth. All these points are describe well in 1984, first from Winston’s point of view and later, in the philosophically sophisticated discourses of O’Brien. In a world existing in our own brain, where the phenomenal reality as we see it is far from the physical one, morality does lose a bit of its glamor. Metaphysics can erode on ethics. Solipsism can annihilate it.

A review, especially one in a blog, doesn’t have to be conventional. So let me boldly outline my criticisms of 1984 así. I believe that the greatest fear of a normal human being is the fear of death. Después de todo, the purpose of life is merely to live a little longer. Everything that our biological faculties do stem from the desire to exist a little longer.

Based on this belief of mine, I find certain events in 1984 a bit incongruous. Why is it that Winston and Julia don’t fear death, but still fear the telescreens and gestapo-like police? Perhaps the fear of pain overrides the fear of death. What do I know, I have never been tortured.

But even the fear of pain can be understood in terms of the ultimate fear. Pain is a messenger of bodily harm, ergo of possible death. But fear of rats?! Perhaps irrational phobias, existing at a sub-cognitive, almost physical, layer may be stronger than everything else. But I cannot help feeling that there is something amiss, something contrived, in the incarceration and torture parts of 1984.

May be Orwell didn’t know how to portray spiritual persecution. Por suerte, none of us knows. So such techniques as rats and betrayal were employed to bring about the hideousness of the process. This part of the book leaves me a bit dissatisfied. Después de todo, our protagonists knew full well what they were getting into, and what the final outcome would be. If they knew their spirit would be broken, then why leave it out there to be broken?